TRESPASSER was built as one of Doc Hog’s custom show bikes. We only built two a year. We endeavour to make them entirely different each time so we don’t get caught in the same rut. Each Dog Hog custom is statically thought-out over beer and pizza before the work begins.

Trespasser was built over a period of 12 months. We started with the frame which took at least three months; it needed to be exact so that each item fitted perfectly.

The fuel tank started with a maze of wire and flat sheet metal which was tacked and welded piece by piece until walla! Check it out! What a masterpiece. We found all the flowing lines to suit the frame.

As time went by, other pieces were added and it slowly came together. Lots of thought went into parts that flowed and one could identify as being individual. That’s what makes a good custom bike.

Assembly is the hardest part of building a show-winning custom bike. Hours upon hours are put into the assembly to ensure it goes together without scratching or damaging anything. At the end of the day, if you fuck up on assembly, it costs you in points at the custom bike shows which can make the difference between winning and loosing (after all that effort).

All custom bikes speak for themselves. Don’t just look at the over-all picture, look up close at the wiring and assembly. That’s where it counts.

Thanks to Jason for his patience and good work, and to everyone who had a hand in contributing to Trespasser’s sensational results.

Doc Hog’s: Facebook

Kristy

MY LIFE is very fast. I live hard, I play hard or work hard. I am always doing something—if I am not stripping, I am doing a photo shoot; if I am not doing a photo shoot, I am renovating; if I am not renovating, I am doing all three.

I illustrate children’s books. I started when I was 12. I am now 26 and I have done eight books. I have made them into a book format; I have just got to find a publisher to publish them. I have been looking for about eight months. It’s pretty hard; you have got to find the right people.

In terms of stripping, I do three nights a week. You pretty much get there at 5 am, you start at 6 and you are there until about 4 to 6 am depending upon what night it is, how busy it is, for about the last seven years. You are paid to work and then whatever you make is yours. I am pretty much the type of person who goes there, makes some money and leaves, that’s it.

I buy, renovate and sell houses. I do about four a year and I am on my fourth this year. I buy a piece of crap and renovate it myself, put it on the market pretty much straight away and then you see how long it takes to sell. The selling bit is the hardest part of the waiting period because you can’t start a new one until you sell the last one.

In the future, I want to get away from the adult side into the home side. I want to finish with my renovations, give up my dancing, settle down, start a family, and probably get my books published.

pics by Walter Wall; words by Dave Saddlier